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Local News

Courtesy of Jared Weems

Will Blue King Crab Ever Rebound In The Pribilof Islands? Marine Biologist Dives For Answers

In the Pribilof Islands, no one’s gotten an accurate count of blue king crab since the population crashed hard in the 1980s. This summer, a marine biologist is trying to change that, with the species’ first in-depth study in more than 30 years. His ultimate goal: Determine if blue crab can make a comeback — or if it’s gone for good. It’s a foggy day on St. Paul Island, and Jared Weems is itching for the weather to clear up. He wants to get out on the water and back to work. “There’s so much...

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Talk of the Town

Brian Conwell

Eagle’s View Elementary Replaces Carpet, Raider Basketball Players Help Out

You might notice something a little different at Eagle’s View Elementary next year. The time finally came to replace the carpet, despite staff and maintenance crew’s taking great care of it. The first step in its replacement, approval by the school board, took place last year. This summer while school was out, the carpet was replaced. Early this summer, the Unalaska Raider Boys’ Basketball team took apart the elementary library so that the carpet could be replaced in there as well. Last...

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Headlines

Women are more enthusiastic than men about the idea of a Trump impeachment, according to the Public Religion Research Institute. Nearly half of women — 47 percent — believe President Trump should be impeached, compared with 32 percent of men.

Seated at a kitchen table in a cramped apartment, Rosendo Gil asks the parents sitting across from him what they should do if their daughter catches a cold.

Blas Lopez, 29, and his fiancée, Lluvia Padilla, 28, are quick with the answer: Check her temperature and call the doctor if she has a fever they can't control.

"I'm very proud of both of you knowing what to do," Gil says, as 3-year-old Leilanie Lopez plays with a pretend kitchen nearby.

Daniel Begay, who is Navajo, had always been told growing up that traditional American Indian foods were good for him.

But because most American Indians are lactose intolerant, "they aren't getting that same source of calcium from dairy products," Begay says.

Turns out that it's a traditional cooking method that is key to his bone health. The Navajo burn juniper branches, collect the ash and stir it into traditional dishes. The most popular: blue corn mush.

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