KUCB KIAL Unalaska Community Broadcasting

Zoe Sobel

Reporter/Host

As a high schooler in Portland, ME, Zoë got her first taste of public radio at NPR's easternmost station. From there, she's slowly moved west -- onto Boston where she studied at Wellesley College and worked at WBUR and WZLY. She's happy to be living close to the ocean again.

Ways to Connect

Courtesy Paul Melovidov

For a long time, scientists thought reindeer would be big losers in climate change, but the reindeer on St. Paul Island are challenging that theory.

As their main winter food source has disappeared, the St. Paul herd has changed its diet so they can survive on the remote island. This adaptation could have global implications for reindeer facing a warming climate.

If there’s one fact everyone agrees on about reindeer, it’s this:

Northern fur seals at St. Paul Island's Reef rookery.
John Ryan/KUCB

 

Northern fur seal pup production on St. Paul Island has hit its lowest level since 1915.

Every other year members of Seattle’s Marine Mammal Laboratory travel to the Pribilof Islands to estimate how many pups are born. Scientist Rod Towell has been a part of the counts since 1992. He says the difference at the rookeries on St. Paul is striking.

Laura Kraegel/KUCB

Staffing at Unalaska’s Department of Public Safety was the focus of Tuesday night's City Council meeting.

City Manager Dave Martinson says there simply aren’t enough police officers to cover the workload. In the last year, he says the department has denied 20 leave requests because of insufficient staffing.

“At the end of the day, I don’t have enough hours of coverage to afford people to do what they need to do to stay fresh,” Martinson said.

The department needs 11 officers. But right now, there are only six.

Chris Waythomas, AVO-USGS

 

New photos show the dramatic effect of volcanic explosions on Bogoslof Island. The Eastern Aleutian island is home to a volcano that has been erupting since mid-December. Now, the tiny island is even smaller and it’s shaped like a hook.

Chris Waythomas, of the U.S. Geological Survey, says the photos also show ash on the island.

“There’s ash draping over everything,” said Waythomas. “There’s a layer of fine muddy-looking ash covering what was a partially vegetated island.”

Newscast: 01/11/17

Jan 11, 2017

The Unalaska Department of Public Safety doesn't have enough police officers to cover its workload; Alaska’s seafood remains free of detectable Fukushima-related radiation; and shellfish in Sand Point are still registering toxin levels too high for safe consumption.

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