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ALASKA SEA GRANT

USFWS

 

 

Dead and dying sea otters are being found along the Aleutian Islands and the Alaska Peninsula.

 

During an aerial survey in March, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service counted 56 dead otters from Cold Bay to Pilot Point.

 

Otters in Port Moller and Nelson Lagoon tested positive for streptococcus infection -- a common cause of sea otter mortality.

 

Melissa Good / Alaska Sea Grant

Unalaskans are used to spotting marine mammals around the island.

But lately, they're not just seeing whales or otters. They're seeing ringed seals — an Arctic species that typically lives far north of the ice-free Aleutian Islands.

Now, scientists are monitoring the unusual visitors to find out why they're here.  

Have you seen this seal?

Feb 9, 2018
Courtesy

Marine Mammal Stranding Network is in search of a yearling ringed seal in Unalaska. The seal spotted earlier this week is likely sick and/or injured and in need of care.

The seal is approximately 2 feet long and light grey with faint rings. If you see this seal, do not touch it and avoid approaching, but please call Unalaska Police Department 581-1233 or the Marine Mammal Stranding Network

1-877-925-7773.

Carrie Goertz, Alaska SeaLife Center

Unalaska’s Sea Grant officers have rescued a northern fur seal pup found stranded on Front Beach. The pup has been sent to Seward’s Alaska Sealife Center for care because he was found far from his rookery and had little chance of survival on his own. He’s not the first pup Unalaska has rescued this year.

In March, the Sealife Center took in a yearling ringed seal from Unalaska. Normally found on the ice, she was out of her range and having trouble regulating her body temperature.

Melissa Good

A search is underway for a young ringed seal that came ashore Sunday in Unalaska.

The stranded marine mammal was first spotted near the Kloosterboer facility at the Port of Dutch Harbor, but Melissa Good said it made its way to the Alyeska seafood plant before disappearing back into the water Monday night.

“We’re not sure if it’s sick or injured, but it’s definitely not acting healthy,” said Good, an agent for the Alaska Sea Grant program and a responder for the National Marine Mammal Stranding Network.

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