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climate change

Graphic courtesy NOAA/Alaska Fisheries Science Center

 

There’s a new tool to help scientists and others interested in monitoring how Bering Sea fisheries respond to a changing climate.

Biologist Steve Barbeaux of the Alaska Fisheries Science Center has created hundreds of graphics mapping where 22 species of fish spend their time during different life stages.

The data comes from annual trawl surveys dating back to 1984, but Barbeaux says that information was hard to analyze as a whole.

Courtesy John Ryan/KUOW

 

For most people, the last day on the job before retiring is a celebration. But Michael Cox capped off his career at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) with a scathing letter to agency head Scott Pruitt.

Since 1987, Cox has worked for the EPA. Most recently he served as climate advisor for Region 10 — which covers Alaska, Washington, Oregon and Idaho.

He was planning on retiring — but not like this. He says he wants the agency to be successful.

Courtesy Paul Melovidov

For a long time, scientists thought reindeer would be big losers in climate change, but the reindeer on St. Paul Island are challenging that theory.

As their main winter food source has disappeared, the St. Paul herd has changed its diet so they can survive on the remote island. This adaptation could have global implications for reindeer facing a warming climate.

If there’s one fact everyone agrees on about reindeer, it’s this:

Aftab Uzzaman/Flickr

 

With coastlines eroding, temperatures rising, and sea ice retreating, Alaska is feeling the effects of a warming planet. But a new federal report suggests fisheries in the state haven’t experienced many observable impacts of climate change so far.

NSF/NGA

 

In Kotzebue a year ago, President Barack Obama called for a publicly available, high-resolution elevation map of Alaska, a map that will help Alaskans monitor the effects of climate change. Now, it’s here.

There are many satellites that orbit the Earth. Typical satellites — like NASA’s Landsat — capture really large images, more than 100 miles across. For this project, the images are much smaller.

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