KUCB KIAL Unalaska Community Broadcasting

MUSEUM OF THE ALEUTIANS

Courtesy Carolyn Reed

Carolyn Reed has been a fixture in Unalaska since 1983. Her solo show “Bering Sea: Works by Carolyn Reed” opens Friday at the Museum of the Aleutians.

The name, Reed explains, comes from the water that surrounds Unalaska.

Berett Wilber/KUCB

Unalaska’s Camp Qungaayux celebrated its twentieth anniversary this year.

The Museum of the Aleutians is honoring that milestone with an exhibit on the history of the island’s culture camp.

Before you check out the opening this weekend, KUCB’s Laura Kraegel has the story from this summer’s Camp Q, where tribal leaders were already looking ahead to the next 20 years.

It’s a clear day at Humpy Cove, and dozens of kids are chattering along the shore. Their careful eyes are trained on the water.

“Bring those kids over here!” says Vince Tutiakoff Sr.

Underwater Forest Exhibit Opens At Museum

Jul 18, 2017
Berett Wilber/KUCB

While the Aleutian Islands may not have trees, a new exhibit at the Museum of the Aleutians shows there’s still a forest.

 

It’s under the ocean. And instead of conifers, it’s made of kelp.

 

NASA Earth Observatory

Not many people make it to the Islands of the Four Mountains.

But with a new exhibit at the Museum of the Aleutians, Unalaskans can now explore one of the chain’s most isolated areas.

“It's a group of islands to the west of us," said MOTA Director Dr. Virginia Hatfield. "Between the Andreanof Islands, which include Adak, and the Fox Islands, which include Unalaska and Umnak, there's a little group of islands and they’re very volcanic.”

Wikimedia Creative Commons

In an effort to bring some movie magic to theater-less Unalaska, the Museum of the Aleutians (MOTA) is kicking off a free foreign film series this weekend.

“One of the things I’ve noticed since moving to Unalaska is that there’s a hunger for movies,” said MOTA Program Director Richard Barnes.

When Barnes arrived on the island last year and discovered there was no cinema, he says using the museum classroom -- complete with a high-quality projector -- seemed like an obvious solution.

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