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Berett Wilber/KUCB

This week jurors in Unalaska are hearing the trial of a man accused of sexually assaulting a 51-year-old woman.

Jorge E. Rivera is charged with two counts attempted sexual assault, two counts of sexual assault, assault, and criminal trespass.

The State of Alaska alleges that in March 2016, Rivera entered the bedroom of a woman and proceeded to touch her without consent and against her requests that he stop.

When officers interviewed Rivera, he said he did not remember entering the woman’s room and said, “if they said I did it, I must have.”

Berett Wilber/KUCB

 

Updated post: 9/14 at 2:45 p.m.

The F/V Akutan no longer has a crew and the ship's 130,000 pounds of salmon has been offloaded.

The processor has been anchored in Unalaska’s Captains Bay since late August and there’s no indication the boat will be leaving soon.

 

“The reality of it is, there's just a huge legal ball that needs to be worked through before any real decision can be made,” said Unalaska Ports Director Peggy McLaughlin.

 

GCI is looking into what it would take to bring faster internet to Unalaska. The telecommunications company is evaluating if fiber would be a financially feasible solution. Right now, they are in the exploratory process.

Spokesperson Heather Handyside said the company is surveying a route between a fiber facility in Levelock and Unalaska.

“If we are to do a build-out of a fiber cable, it will help us understand how to best engineer that cable so that it can withstand all the elements or obstacles that it might encounter,” Handyside said.

Berett Wilber/KUCB

Come October, Unalaska will need a new city manager. Current City Manager Dave Martinson has tendered his resignation and accepted the terms of his amended contract Friday.

The deal, proposed by Unalaska’s City Council, will give Martinson nearly $30,000 in severance and moving expenses plus two weeks of free rent in his current city home.

His last day is September 29.

Zoë Sobel/KUCB

What do you want from Unalaska’s library? What does the library do well? What could it do better? Those were a few of the questions posed to 30 Unalaskans at the first public meeting accessing what users think could make the library better meet the needs of the community.

Overall community members were vocal about their support for the library staff and services. But there was one overwhelming concern.

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