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Regional

Stories from the KUCB Newsroom from the Aleutian Region, the Pribilof Islands, the Alaska Peninsula, and beyond.

Laura Kraegel/KUCB

Seventy-five years ago, almost 900 Unangan people were removed from their homes by the U.S. government and interred in southeast Alaska.

Officials said they were trying to protect Native communities from the Japanese during World War II. But the Unangax were forced to live in crowded camps with little access to food, water, or medical attention.

This week,  we heard from Unalaskan descendants of the evacuees about what that difficult history means to them.

Janice Krukoff

Laura Kraegel/KUCB

The head of PenAir fielded questions Thursday from frustrated flyers in Unalaska.

Thirty island residents gathered at a public meeting to ask CEO Danny Seybert why their only option for traveling to and from Anchorage has been so unreliable over the last year.

Nancy Heise

While the M/V Tustumena sits in the shipyard for another two months, residents of southwest Alaska have another option for cargo service.

The Seattle-based Coastal Transportation company has offered to carry cargo along the Tustumena’s route while the ferry undergoes unexpected repairs.

“It doesn’t completely solve the problem, but it definitely helps to alleviate some of the crisis,” said Meadow Bailey of the Alaska Department of Transportation.

Daher Jorge

Three months ago, a crab boat went missing in the Bering Sea with no mayday signal. Three days after that, responders called off their unsuccessful search.

Six fishermen died. A vessel was lost. All just a few miles offshore.

The search for answers is still underway: What happened to the F/V Destination?

It’s a Friday night, and the Norwegian Rat Saloon is packed.

Nancy Heise

Repairs have delayed the M/V Tustumena more than a month, forcing the Alaska Marine Highway System to cancel several sailings for southwest Alaska.

The ferry was supposed to return to service May 27. But now, officials say the Tustumena won’t be fit to leave its Ketchikan shipyard until July 18.

“There was some discovery during its annual overhaul that there was additional, extensive steel waste in the engine room," said Meadow Bailey, spokesperson for the Alaska Department of Transportation. "That repair will take about two months longer to complete.”

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