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Regional

Stories from the KUCB Newsroom from the Aleutian Region, the Pribilof Islands, the Alaska Peninsula, and beyond.

U.S. Navy

This week, the U.S. Navy is searching for World War II-era explosives that may still be hiding in waters around Unalaska.

It’s unclear how much leftover ordnance is lurking offshore, according to Leslie Yuenger of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command. But she needs help from Unalaskans to find it.

Berett Wilber/KUCB

Saturday marks a big day in Unalaska’s history. Just ask Harriet Hope.

“It’s just such a part of history that nobody knows," she said. "It hasn’t been taught in schools. People say, 'I've never heard of that,' and yet they’ve heard of the Japanese internment.”

Hope is talking about the bombing and subsequent evacuation of Dutch Harbor during World War II. She was just a child when the Japanese Navy attacked

Laura Kraegel/KUCB

Seventy-five years ago, almost 900 Unangan people were removed from their homes by the U.S. government and interned in southeast Alaska.

Officials said they were trying to protect Native communities from the Japanese during World War II. But the Unangax were forced to live in crowded camps with little access to food, water, or medical attention.

This week,  we heard from Unalaskan descendants of the evacuees about what that difficult history means to them.

Janice Krukoff

Laura Kraegel/KUCB

The head of PenAir fielded questions Thursday from frustrated flyers in Unalaska.

Thirty island residents gathered at a public meeting to ask CEO Danny Seybert why their only option for traveling to and from Anchorage has been so unreliable over the last year.

Nancy Heise

While the M/V Tustumena sits in the shipyard for another two months, residents of southwest Alaska have another option for cargo service.

The Seattle-based Coastal Transportation company has offered to carry cargo along the Tustumena’s route while the ferry undergoes unexpected repairs.

“It doesn’t completely solve the problem, but it definitely helps to alleviate some of the crisis,” said Meadow Bailey of the Alaska Department of Transportation.

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