KUCB KIAL Unalaska Community Broadcasting

SCIENCE

Max Kaufman/Alaska Volcano Observatory/University of Alaska Fairbanks, Geophysical Institute

 

Scientists have had a hard time monitoring Bogoslof volcano since it started erupting in December. The island is so small, there is no equipment on the volcano, making it difficult to predict eruptions.

No one lives on Bogoslof – the closest human neighbors are 60 miles away in Unalaska. Scientists monitor from afar and they’ve had a lot to monitor lately. The volcano has erupted more than 40 times since December.

Max Kaufman/AVO/UAF-GI

Bogoslof Volcano erupted Tuesday night for the first time in two months.

The eastern Aleutian volcano blew around 10:30 p.m., spewing ash 34,000 feet into the air.

The explosion lasted about 73 minutes, according to the Alaska Volcano Observatory.

While seismic activity has since stopped, scientists say Bogoslof could erupt again with little warning. They’ve also issued a marine advisory for potential ash fall in the region between Cape Sarichef and Nikolski.

T. Keith, U.S. Geological Survey

Several small earthquakes shook the area around Bogoslof Volcano on Saturday, prompting scientists to raise its alert level to an intermediate “watch.”

Bogoslof hasn’t erupted in over a month, but officials with the Alaska Volcano Observatory say seismic activity over the weekend has increased the likelihood of another explosion.

Before going quiet last month, the eastern Aleutian volcano had erupted 37 times since mid-December.

WAISC/Sea Grant

Unalaska is hosting a regional science conference that’s slated to bring dozens of experts to the island later this month, along with new research on energy, fisheries, and climate change.

Melissa Good is one of the organizers of the four-day Western Alaska Interdisciplinary Science Conference (WAISC).

"It’s usually in Dillingham," said Good. "We’re getting a treat this year by actually bringing it to Unalaska, so local residents can be a part of it.”

Zoë Sobel/KUCB

 

The fishing industry in Unalaska is dominated by men. But behind the scenes, at the local branch of a public health and safety company, there’s a woman running the show.

Nicole Beier works for NSF International, a company responsible for quality testing fish at America’s top fishing port. And now she’s tasked with expanding their capacity.

Beier always knew she wanted to work in science, but never imagined she’d end up in Unalaska.

Pages