KUCB KIAL Unalaska Community Broadcasting

Science & Environment

Science and environmental reporting on news and community topics. Science coverage is occasionally provided by community members.

Sports Fishing Report: June 1, 2017

Jun 1, 2017

Reports of excellent dolly varden fishing have already come in. King salmon fishing in the saltwaters has also been good and improving, anglers are reminded that the limit is 2 per day. Sockeye have even been reported!

Unalaska Bay/Dutch Harbor Road System

Issued June 1, 2017

Regulation reminders:

· The bag limit for Unalaska Bay fresh and saltwaters is 5 salmon per day of which only 2 may be sockeye.

· The bag limit for the remainder of Unalaska Island is 5 salmon per day all of which may be sockeye or coho.

Weekly Sports Fishing Report: May 26, 2017

May 25, 2017

ADFG Weekly Fishing report, May 26, 2017: Summer is here! (or near!) This is the first weekly fishing report for the year and reports of excellent dolly varden fishing have already come in. King salmon fishing in the saltwaters has also been good and anglers are reminded that the limit is 2 per day. Stay tuned for more information in the coming weeks, sockeye will show up sooner than we think

Regulation reminders:

Vladimir Burkanov/NOAA

 

New research could help wildlife managers better protect declining Steller sea lion populations. The study looks at why sea lions zero in on specific hunting hotspots.

For humans, knowing where to find food is easy. But biologist Mike Sigler says for Steller sea lions, it’s a different story.

Max Kaufman/AVO/UAF-GI

Bogoslof Volcano erupted Tuesday night for the first time in two months.

The eastern Aleutian volcano blew around 10:30 p.m., spewing ash 34,000 feet into the air.

The explosion lasted about 73 minutes, according to the Alaska Volcano Observatory.

While seismic activity has since stopped, scientists say Bogoslof could erupt again with little warning. They’ve also issued a marine advisory for potential ash fall in the region between Cape Sarichef and Nikolski.

Creative Commons photo courtesy of Dick Daniels

 

The massive murre die-off that left tens of thousands of dead birds on Alaska’s coast in 2015 and 2016 may be over, but the population is still struggling. In the Gulf of Alaska and Bering Sea, surviving murres are failing to reproduce.

“When we got to most of the breeding colonies last summer we found that very few birds were attending the cliffs and almost complete reproductive failure at most of the colonies we looked at,” said Heather Renner, a biologist for the Alaska Maritime Wildlife Refuge.

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