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Science & Environment

Science and environmental reporting on news and community topics. Science coverage is occasionally provided by community members.

Graphic courtesy NOAA/Alaska Fisheries Science Center

 

There’s a new tool to help scientists and others interested in monitoring how Bering Sea fisheries respond to a changing climate.

Biologist Steve Barbeaux of the Alaska Fisheries Science Center has created hundreds of graphics mapping where 22 species of fish spend their time during different life stages.

The data comes from annual trawl surveys dating back to 1984, but Barbeaux says that information was hard to analyze as a whole.

U.S. Geological Survey / Alaska Earthquake Center

A series of earthquakes shook the Aleutian Islands Monday morning, including a strong 6.4-magnitude quake near Adak.

According to the Alaska Earthquake Center, the big event struck at 9 a.m. about 80 miles west of the community, where about 350 people live.

“I would suspect that it was close enough to Adak that they should have felt it, but it’s probably not big enough to cause damage,” said seismologist Natalia Ruppert.

Laura Kraegel/KUCB

Over the weekend, 60 Unalaskans hit the streets -- and the beach -- to participate in the People’s Climate March.

Local demonstrators joined hundreds of thousands of people nationwide in protesting the Trump administration’s policies on the environment and raising awareness about climate change.

“Boom! Like thunder! Climate change will take you under!" High school students led the charge at Unalaska's march, chanting at the front of the group. "Flash! Like lightning! Climate change is so darn frightening!”

Courtesy Larry Schmidt

 

The novelty of seeing a jumbo squid in Unalaska is not wearing off: a second one washed ashore Monday night.

David Tonon of the U.S. Coast Guard was excited to check it out — he’s never seen anything like it.

“I’ve seen little squid, squid we use for bait, squid at aquariums, and when I was diving in the Caribbean,” Tonon said. “But nothing that big. The thing had to weigh 50 pounds or so, probably more.”

U.S. Geological Survey vis Wikimedia Commons

Cleveland Volcano has produced a new batch of lava, prompting scientists to raise the volcano’s alert level to an intermediate “watch.”

Over the last few weeks, satellite images have shown the lava grow from a small mound deep in Cleveland’s crater to a wide dome spanning nearly 150 feet.

The Alaska Volcano Observatory hasn’t detected any seismic activity near the volcano, which sits about 50 miles west of Nikolski in the Islands of the Four Mountains. But scientists have observed elevated surface temperatures.

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