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Local News

The KUCB Newsroom provides newscasts every weekday at noon and 5 PM on KUCB Radio.  The week's news is also compiled for Flash! News on Channel 8 Television.  You can find many of our local news stories here.

Laura Kraegel/KUCB

The Rasmuson Foundation has recognized Unalaska's Gert Svarny as its Distinguished Artist of 2017. The award comes with a $40,000 grant so the 87-year-old sculptor can continue developing her craft.

In Gert Svarny’s living room, tucked safely between a cushy armchair and a window looking out on the beach, sits one of her most recent sculptures.

“Her name is Little Feather," says Svarny. "In Unangam Tunuu, it’s Huqdun Angunaqdaayulu.”

Daher Jorge

Three months ago, a crab boat went missing in the Bering Sea with no mayday signal. Three days after that, responders called off their unsuccessful search.

Six fishermen died. A vessel was lost. All just a few miles offshore.

The search for answers is still underway: What happened to the F/V Destination?

It’s a Friday night, and the Norwegian Rat Saloon is packed.

Creative Commons photo courtesy of Dick Daniels

 

The massive murre die-off that left tens of thousands of dead birds on Alaska’s coast in 2015 and 2016 may be over, but the population is still struggling. In the Gulf of Alaska and Bering Sea, surviving murres are failing to reproduce.

“When we got to most of the breeding colonies last summer we found that very few birds were attending the cliffs and almost complete reproductive failure at most of the colonies we looked at,” said Heather Renner, a biologist for the Alaska Maritime Wildlife Refuge.

KUCB File Photo

The City of Unalaska is closing in on a $29 million budget for fiscal year 2018.

On Tuesday night, the City Council unanimously voted to send the financial plan to its second and final reading later this month.

The FY18 budget proposal would allow the city to spend about $500,000 more than it did this year.

Graphic courtesy NOAA/Alaska Fisheries Science Center

 

There’s a new tool to help scientists and others interested in monitoring how Bering Sea fisheries respond to a changing climate.

Biologist Steve Barbeaux of the Alaska Fisheries Science Center has created hundreds of graphics mapping where 22 species of fish spend their time during different life stages.

The data comes from annual trawl surveys dating back to 1984, but Barbeaux says that information was hard to analyze as a whole.

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