KUCB KIAL Unalaska Community Broadcasting

bogoslof

T. Keith, U.S. Geological Survey

Bogoslof Volcano blew again Monday morning, marking its thirty-seventh explosion since the volcano roared back to life three months ago.

The short blast began around 3:30 a.m. and lasted just 12 minutes.

While the eruption produced an ash cloud, the Alaska Volcano Observatory has not predicted ash fall for Unalaska.

Scientists say this explosion appears to be over, and the AVO has left Bogoslof’s alert level at an intermediate “watch.” 

Janet Schaefer/ADGGS/AVO

The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) has lowered the alert levels for two Aleutian volcanoes.

Bogoslof is back at the intermediate "watch" level, following a powerful eruption Tuesday night.

The volcano hasn’t produced ash since that three-hour blast and its seismicity has died off, but scientists say Bogoslof could blow again with little warning.

Meanwhile, Cleveland Volcano -- 45 miles west of Nikolski -- has been quiet since a small eruption last month.

Dave Schneider/USGS/AVO

Bogoslof Volcano exploded Tuesday night in its most powerful eruption since activity began three months ago.

Given the intensity of the three-hour blast, scientists expected Unalaskans to wake up and find the island dusted with ash.

Kristi Wallace of the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) said she was puzzled when that didn’t happen.

Janet Schaefer/ADGGS/AVO

Bogoslof Volcano stayed busy over the long weekend, erupting at least five times since Friday.

Janet Schaefer was lucky enough to see an explosion Sunday while she took a helicopter to the northwestern edge of Unalaska Island.

Schaefer works for the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), and she was there collecting ash samples from an eruption that dusted the island late last month.

Courtesy Jerry Morris

 

The news may sound familiar: There’s a volcano erupting in the Aleutian chain that’s a refuge for marine mammals and sea birds. But it isn’t Bogoslof, it’s Kasatochi — a volcano near Adak that erupted for the first time in modern memory in 2008. That eruption has given scientists the opportunity to study how life returns after cataclysmic destruction.

Kasatochi Island was an inactive volcano. It wasn’t supposed to erupt.

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