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bogoslof

Courtesy Jerry Morris

 

The news may sound familiar: There’s a volcano erupting in the Aleutian chain that’s a refuge for marine mammals and sea birds. But it isn’t Bogoslof, it’s Kasatochi — a volcano near Adak that erupted for the first time in modern memory in 2008. That eruption has given scientists the opportunity to study how life returns after cataclysmic destruction.

Kasatochi Island was an inactive volcano. It wasn’t supposed to erupt.

AVO / U.S. Geological Survey

Scientists have returned Takawangha Volcano’s alert level to “normal,” saying nearby seismic activity has steadily dissipated over the last two weeks.

The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) detected an "energetic" swarm of earthquakes near the volcano late last month.

Sixty miles west of Adak, Takawangha has no known eruptions in the historical record. But the activity prompted the AVO to raise its alert level to “advisory,” indicating elevated unrest.

T. Keith, U.S. Geological Survey

Bogoslof Volcano has exploded more than two dozen times since December, but not all eruptions are created equal.

On Friday, for instance, the Aleutian volcano spit ash about 20,000 feet into the air during a brief half-hour blast that dusted Bogoslof Island and not much else. It was a far cry from last Monday’s eruption.

That event lasted eight hours, spewing ash 35,000 feet high and coating Unalaska -- more than 50 miles away -- with a fine layer. 

Photo by Eric Keto/Alaska’s Energy Desk

 

Across Alaska there are monitoring instruments on 31 of the most active volcanoes, but there’s nothing on the one that’s erupting now.

Zoe Sobel/KUCB

After more than two dozen explosions, Bogoslof Volcano has finally dropped ash on Unalaska.

In its longest eruption since activity began six weeks ago, the volcano dusted the island with less than a millimeter of ash Monday night and produced a strong sulfurous smell.

The eruption lasted eight hours, starting at 8:20 p.m. with a series of explosions that eventually morphed into a continuous ash plume.

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