KUCB KIAL Unalaska Community Broadcasting




Seven years ago this week, a magnitude 9.1 earthquake stuck off the coast of Japan, triggering a tsunami with waves up to 30 feet high. The event ravaged communities, and its after effects have been felt across the Pacific.

Courtesy of Melissa Good


In the past year, two ice seals have turned up in Unalaska — way outside their natural range. The first was spotted in late February 2017 and less than a year later another was photographed near town.

SeaGrant's Melissa Good says ringed seals don’t belong in Unalaska.

“Ringed seals are ice associated seals so they live and kind of work around the ice,” she said. “They want to haul out on the ice for pupping, molting, and resting.”

Courtesy Noel Pelland/Proceedings of the Tribunal of Arbitration at Paris, Volume 7.


In the late 1800s, the U.S. Secretary of the Treasury sent Captain C. L. Hooper to the Pribilof Islands to learn as much as he could about the northern fur seal from the Alaska Native people who lived there. At the time, the fur trade was big business.

One of the lessons he recorded was that the seals are known to travel with the wind when possible. Now scientists have the data to back up that traditional knowledge.



Scientists found an enriched uranium particle over the Aleutian Islands and don’t know where it came from. In 20 years of aerial surveys, it’s the first time researchers have detected a particle like this. It’s not naturally occurring uranium – it’s the kind that might be found in nuclear bombs or fuel.

Berett Wilber/KUCB


Unalaskans know the island’s wind is strong — it can blow over 100 miles per hour.

Back in 2005, the city council funded a study to see if that wind could be used for power generation. The former city manager, Nancy Peterson, said that they basically concluded that it wasn’t possible because there was no technology strong enough to withstand Unalaska’s wind.