KUCB KIAL Unalaska Community Broadcasting

School News

Things happening at UCSD.

Raider Reflections: The Fog

Feb 15, 2017

According to the CNN article “The Dangers of Dripping, Artisanal Vaping”, 1,874 students reported having tried an E-cigarette.  However, more than 26 percent of those who’d tried vaping also reported dripping, which is putting in more juice, according to a doctor who is investigating e- cigarettes. People mostly like e-cigarettes because of the thick clouds of vapor that gives a stronger sensation in the throat. Although it has an appealing flavor; it doesn’t mean it’s good for you.

Donald Trump’s visa ban for citizens from seven predominantly Muslim nations violates their principles. I don’t think that Muslims should be excluded from entering the United States because of their religion. Why would Donald Trump ban Muslims? Just because of terrorism? I don’t think this is a good way to protect the United States or any other country.

In our school, we are offered three different foreign languages; these include German, Russian, and Spanish. All of these languages are fun to learn, and have many benefits because a large percentage of the world speaks them. There are many ways that learning these can be helpful for the future, but here in the community of Unalaska, over forty percent of people are Filipino, and speak Tagalog. Knowing this, I think that it would be a more immediate interest to be able to learn Tagalog as a foreign language.

Zoë Sobel / KUCB

 

After 26 years, it’s the end of an era for Unalaska’s preschool. Teacher Susan Carlisle is retiring today.

“I’m going to be 73 this summer; it’s time to quit,” Carlisle said. “My energy at the end of the day is like, 'oh I’m tired.' But, it is hard to leave. It’s hard to leave the island. I’ve been here 38 years, so I’m going to miss it a lot.”

Zoe Sobel/KUCB

Most high schoolers have a pretty easy life -- school, homework, and maybe an extra curricular or two. But not Stephanie Torres. 

On top of her schoolwork, the 20-year-old works as a checker at Unalaska's Safeway. Today, there are lots of customers. Customers stretching halfway across the store. And they’re all waiting for her.

"Did I get set up?" She asked.

For almost 30 minutes, people have filed through Stephanie’s line and after buying an item; they give her an envelope and maybe a hug. All part of a “Flash Cash Mob” to recognize Stephanie.

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