KUCB KIAL Unalaska Community Broadcasting

Science & Environment

Science and environmental reporting on news and community topics. Science coverage is occasionally provided by community members.

T. Keith, U.S. Geological Survey

Bogoslof Volcano blew again Monday morning, marking its thirty-seventh explosion since the volcano roared back to life three months ago.

The short blast began around 3:30 a.m. and lasted just 12 minutes.

While the eruption produced an ash cloud, the Alaska Volcano Observatory has not predicted ash fall for Unalaska.

Scientists say this explosion appears to be over, and the AVO has left Bogoslof’s alert level at an intermediate “watch.” 

Laura Kraegel/KUCB

 

Late on a Friday afternoon Melissa Good sits on her front step filling out labels for a dog carrier. The crate is not for her dog. It holds a yearling ringed seal.

“He looks like he’d be nice and light and fluffy like a fluff ball, but not the case,” she said. “He’s heavier than he looks. He’s really dense! About two feet long about 30 pounds.”

 

Janet Schaefer/ADGGS/AVO

The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) has lowered the alert levels for two Aleutian volcanoes.

Bogoslof is back at the intermediate "watch" level, following a powerful eruption Tuesday night.

The volcano hasn’t produced ash since that three-hour blast and its seismicity has died off, but scientists say Bogoslof could blow again with little warning.

Meanwhile, Cleveland Volcano -- 45 miles west of Nikolski -- has been quiet since a small eruption last month.

Dave Schneider/USGS/AVO

Bogoslof Volcano exploded Tuesday night in its most powerful eruption since activity began three months ago.

Given the intensity of the three-hour blast, scientists expected Unalaskans to wake up and find the island dusted with ash.

Kristi Wallace of the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) said she was puzzled when that didn’t happen.

Courtesy Chugach Children’s Forest

 

When you open a REI catalog or page through Outside magazine, what do you see? Do the people on the page look like you? Arctic Youth Ambassador Reth Duir is working to make that imagery more representative.

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