KUCB KIAL Unalaska Community Broadcasting

Science & Environment

Science and environmental reporting on news and community topics. Science coverage is occasionally provided by community members.

Agencies Seek Public Input in Use of Dispersants

Dec 5, 2016
KUCB File Photo

NOTICE OF PUBLIC INPUT PERIOD FOR DESIGNATION OF OIL SPILL DISPERSANT AVOIDANCE AREA OFF THE COAST OF ALASKA

Zoë Sobel/KUCB

St. Paul’s greenhouse isn’t what you’d imagine. There’s no big glass structure. All the windows are covered from the inside. It’s underneath the city’s grocery store on the first floor of the building.

It’s hydroponic. Blue and red LED lights hang suspended above the plants. Pumps fill the room with white noise.

"Let’s try to find a big one,” said greenhouse manager Dallas Roberts.

He drops by on a recent afternoon to harvest six heads of lettuce.

Courtesy Lauren Divine

 

Gregory Fratis Sr. isn’t a fan of salmon.

“Fresh cooked salmon, uh, uh. I don’t like it,” said Fratis. “I can taste that fishy taste.”

The 76-year-old says salmon aren’t worth the trouble. It takes too more time to catch and process each individual fish. To fill his freezer for the year, he’d rather catch seal, one of the Pribilof Islands’ traditional foods.

U.S. Geological Survey vis Wikimedia Commons

An explosion at one of Alaska's most active volcanoes has led scientists to raise its alert level from "advisory" to "watch."

Cleveland Volcano is located on an uninhabited island in the central Aleutians. On Monday afternoon, the Alaska Volcano Observatory detected a short-lived explosion that was also heard by residents of Nikolski, 45 miles away.

Chris Waythomas is a geologist with the observatory, and he said this is common behavior for the often-restless volcano.

Zoë Sobel/KUCB

 

The Pribilof Islands in the Bering Sea are a magnet for scientists who come to study everything from fur seals to migratory birds. When they leave, that research often leaves with them.

But for the last nine years, the local tribe has found a way to bring it back home. Each fall, a group of scientists return — not to do research, but to share its findings with the students of Saint Paul and Saint George Islands.

For the first time this year, a former student is now a teacher.

Pages