KUCB KIAL Unalaska Community Broadcasting

TSUNAMI

(NOAA)

 

Seven years ago this week, a magnitude 9.1 earthquake stuck off the coast of Japan, triggering a tsunami with waves up to 30 feet high. The event ravaged communities, and its after effects have been felt across the Pacific.

Courtesy Roger Blakeley

The National Weather Service canceled a tsunami warning for the Gulf of Alaska this morning, after a magnitude 7.9 earthquake struck near Kodiak around 12:30 a.m.

In Unalaska, tsunami sirens started blaring at 1:50 a.m. – and residents were encouraged to move at least 50 feet above sea level.

Around 200 people sheltered at city hall and the clinic including Iata Akopo. He’s new to Unalaska, but in 2009 he experienced a major tsunami at home in Samoa.

National Tsunami Warning Center screenshot

 

No tsunami is expected in the Aleutians, after a large earthquake near Russia’s Kamchatka Peninsula. The National Tsunami Warning Center briefly issued a tsunami advisory Monday for the western Aleutian Islands.

 

“There was a magnitude 6.5 [earthquake Monday] morning and this was a magnitude 7.8," said tsunami science warning officer Paul Huang. "In theory, we don't know when the next one will come. It could be a few minutes from now. It could be another 100 years.”

 

Tsunami Threat Cleared For Aleutian Islands

Jul 17, 2017

A 7.8 magnitude earthquake near Russia’s Commander Islands briefly triggered a Tsunami Advisory for the Aleutian Chain this afternoon.  The earthquake occurred at 3:34 AKST, and the U.S. Tsunami Warning System removed the warning within an hour of the quake. Unalaska’s Department of Public Safety provided updates during the Advisory on their information line at (907) 581 – 6080, and using Nixle alerts.  

U.S. Geological Survey / Alaska Earthquake Center

A series of earthquakes shook the Aleutian Islands Monday morning, including a strong 6.4-magnitude quake near Adak.

According to the Alaska Earthquake Center, the big event struck at 9 a.m. about 80 miles west of the community, where about 350 people live.

“I would suspect that it was close enough to Adak that they should have felt it, but it’s probably not big enough to cause damage,” said seismologist Natalia Ruppert.